Hormones cheat sheet

"To control your hormones is to control your life" - Barry Sears


Thank you for joining me for blog 30 (!), highlighting decision-making and the brain. This is my public exploration of what drives decision-making and how we can use that information to make better decisions, resulting in better outcomes.


Over the last 8 weeks I have covered (individual blogs listed below) what I consider to be the key hormones that could influence your decision making and some key takeaways. I was not planning this blog, but so many people have asked me, how can I quickly reference how I am feeling and good ways to access the hormones you write about. This is for you.





Another idea I am playing with right now


Why is that enjoyment is usually seen as a choice between i) enjoying yourself by doing things that are bad for you (vice) or ii) things that you do not enjoy that are good for you (chore). In the cheatsheet above, we notice there are many ways to feel good (joy) that are good for you long term. I will be coming back to this in a future blog, but will leave you with the framework to have a think about too. Would love to hear what your think about this.


So what?


How is this all relevant to decision-making? Here are three take-aways I want to leave you with before we pick it up next week:


1) Our best thinking operates within a balance of hormones


2) There are good and bad ways to access our hormones. Be aware of both.


3) Exercise, mental and physical rest and cold showers are quick hacks to access a number of positive mental effects.


Thank you for joining. Next week we will cover 'Words/phrases people use to try and mislead you'.


Individual Blogs.


Dopamine

Dopamine - why is everyone talking about it? (hartejsingh.com)

The digital addiction industry (hartejsingh.com)


Oxytocin

Oxytocin - the hormone of trust (hartejsingh.com)


Serotonin

The hormone of respect - Serotonin (hartejsingh.com)


Endorphins

Endorphins - the hormone of relief (hartejsingh.com)


Cortisol

Cortisol - the hormone of alarm (hartejsingh.com)